Seven Areas Of Responsibility In Health Education Essay

Being a health education specialist serves an important role in business, health care, and non-profit organizations. Working in these settings, “there are currently more than 66,200 health educators promoting healthy lifestyles, conducting and evaluating health improvement programs, advocating and implementing change in health policies, procedures, and services (Sophe.org, 2010).” To complete these tasks effectively, health education specialists must have strong skills in “evaluation and survey research, program design and management, coalition building, policy/systems change, health literacy, health communications, social media, curriculum development and training, motivational interviewing, behavior change methods, and capacity building at…

The seven areas of responsibility are “assessing individual and community needs for health education, planning effective health education programs, implementing heath education programs, evaluating the effectiveness of health education programs, coordinating the provision of health education services, acting as a resource person in health education, and communicating health and health education needs, concerns, and resources (Romas & Sharma, 2012, p. 10).” The exam itself consists of 165 multiple choice questions, 12% of the questions are related to the first areas of responsibility, 15% is related to both the second and fourth areas of responsibility, 24% is related to the third areas of responsibility, 11% related to the fifth areas of responsibility, 16% related to the sixth areas of responsibility, and 7% related to the seventh areas of responsibility (NCHEC,…

Eligibility is based on academic qualification, the bare minimum is having at least a bachelor’s degree, and an official transcript that clearly shows a major in health education or an official transcript that reflects at least 25 semester hours of coursework is required (NCHEC, n.d.). Then, a CHES exam application must be completed either online, pdf download, mail, or prescreen services. The application itself includes a signed form, application fee, official transcripts, and advisor letter if 90-day option is used (NCHEC, n.d.). Most people prepare for the exam by studying CHES study guides and suggested readings such as the Health Education Specialist: A Companion Guide for Professional Excellence 6th Edition, a Competency-Based Framework for Health Education Specialists — 2010, the Health Education Specialist: A Companion Guide for Professional Excellence, 7th Edition, and a Competency-Based Framework for Health Education Specialists – 2015. Also, there are study sessions sponsored by SCDHEC Bureau of CH & CDP/Health Education and the SC Association for the Advancement of Health Education (SCAAHE) accessible in different…