Genghis Khan: Destined to be a Hero

Arriving in this world with a blood clot in the palm of his hand , Genghis Khan was destined to be a hero. In 1167, Genghis Khan was born to Yisugei, Chieftain of the Kiyat-Borjigid, and his wife Ho’elun. He was named Temujin (which means blacksmith) after a Tatar Chieftain his father had just captured. … Read more

Crisis, Unrest, and the Possibility for Peace

True to many observers that since there hasn’t been any major conflicts to start the second half of the 20th century that there should be peace and prosperity in the world. The truth though shows a different picture of this time period. Prosperity was very prevelent in the world and many of the countries that … Read more

How the 1970s Shaped American History

The Nineteen Seventies was a pop culture decade. From Hippies to Disco and Saturday Night Fever to The Brady Bunch, the Seventies were full of cultural changes that shaped society for years to come. Although pop culture was important, many political outcomes also occurred. The Watergate scandal, the official end of the Vietnam conflict, and … Read more

Imperial Telecommunications

Imperialism has existed in the world since the beginning of government all together, but this practice took a dramatic turn in the latter half of the nineteenth century. New inventions, modern thinking, and stronger governments all made imperialism easier. Now thousands of miles could be conquered in a matter of months; an empire could have … Read more

Charlemagne, King of the Franks

Throughout history, there have been many good and bad rulers, from the bravery of Alexander the Great, to the madness of George III. None, however, helped shape European feudalism like Charlemagne, King of the Franks, First of the Holy Roman Emperors. His advancements in government were not his only advancements though. He created an educational … Read more

Hiroshima Essay

Up until August 6th, occasional bombs, which did no great damage had fallen on Hiroshima. Many cities roundabout, one after another were destroyed, but Hiroshima itself remained protected. There were daily observations of planes over the city, but none of them dropped a bomb. The citizens wondered why they alone, had remained undisturbed for such … Read more

Luther the Father of the Natzis

Anti-Semite. The word rests in a conversation like a foul stench and with it comes unbidden images and accusations. Today in many circles this word alone is possibly the most horrendous name to place on a person. Maybe though, not because of what it means, but because of what it brings to mind. Automatically and … Read more

Berlin Blockade

On June 26, 1948 the largest airlift began as the American and British forces began the Berlin Airlift. To understand how the airlift came to be, we have to look all the way back to the Yalta Conference. The Yalta Conference began in February 1945 in which the three superpowers, America, Russia and Britain, met … Read more

Dwight David Eisenhower

He was born in a small town called Deniso in western Texas in the year 1890 (Hargrove 22). Then he and his family moved to a railroad town called Abilene in the state of Kansas. Here Dwight Eisenhower grew upwith his 13 other family members. (Hargrove 19). Dwight David Eisenhower is one of Americas greatest … Read more

Nova Scotia

Nova Scotia, one of the three Maritime and one of the four Atlantic provinces of Canada, bordered on the north by the Bay of Fundy, the province of New Brunswick, Northumberland Strait, and the Gulf of Saint Lawrence and on the east, south, and west by the Atlantic Ocean. Nova Scotia consists primarily of a … Read more

Fort Pillow Attack

It is almost as difficult to find consistent information about the incident at Fort Pillow as it is to determine the moral significance of its outcome. Scholars disagree about exactly what transpired on April 12, 1864 at Fort Pillow, when General Nathan Bedford Forrest captured the fort with his 1,500 troops and claimed numerous Union … Read more

Crusades Essay

In the Middle Ages, Christians considered Palestine the Holy Land because it was where Jesus had lived and taught. The Arabs had conquered Palestine in the 600s. Most Arabs were Muslims, but they usually tolerated other religions. Jews and Christians who paid their taxes and observed other regulations were free to live in Palestine and … Read more

The Bubonic Plague in Europe

The Black Death in Europe was one of the continents worth natural disasters. The bubonic plague wiped out nearly 60% of the population, causing changes that took many years to recover. The effects of art are astonishing. Every person and social class were affected, the church lost prestige and power, as did the doctors and … Read more