Essay about Maria Montessori Childhood

Introduction
Over the years there have been many innovative leaders in the field of psychology, Maria Montessori was one of them. Maria was born in 1870 and became the first woman in Italy to receive a medical degree. She embedded herself into her work and made significant contributions to the fields of psychiatry, anthropology and education. Maria was acclaimed for her education method that built on the way children learned naturally. She believed in order expand any system of education a favorable environment must be created to allow the flow of a child’s natural gift. Maria Montessori was one of the greatest pioneers of theories in early childhood education, and her work continues throughout the United States and around the globe….

The investigation emphasizes the unconscious dynamic of mimetic relationships and their root in the body. The immersion of language, cultural norms, and customs by children is more than a metaphor. The child is taking the world into himself through his hands, eyes, ears, nose, and mouth. For this physical exploration of the world to take place, the world must be brought into focus and remain in view. The centrality of objects for development in early childhood offers a sharp contrast to a mimetic rivalry, in which objects become less important than the competition itself (Ross, 2012). Dr. Maria Montessori’s model of education provides an outline for children to have mediated, but intense object relationships by training teachers to perform benign or withdrawn mediation. Teachers thus initiate the possibility of a shared admiration of the object, thereby opening up the opportunity for the child to have direct interaction with the material world. In this way, children are inducted into a healthy pattern of desire in which acquisitive desire remains fluid, models remain luminous, and objects remain in view (Ross,…

According to (Bagby, Sulak, 2013) Montessori’s development of interpersonal and intrapersonal skills through work complements current research in leadership development. Practicing leadership inside and outside the classroom, students learn to be leaders (Posner, 2009). Many pupils in the Montessori classroom may be unaware of their ongoing leadership development because it is often a part of the hidden curriculum (Bagby, Sulak, 2013). For instance, students in a Montessori classroom will serve as class leaders and run class meetings without assistance from teachers. Also, older students serve as leaders for younger students in multiage classrooms. Montessori students practice leadership within the classroom on a daily basis, often without realizing the benefits (Bagby, Sulak,…