Pocahontas Film Analysis Research Paper

I’ve known about Pocahontas ever since I was a little girl. I used to sit in front of the TV and watch it over and over again until I finally got bored. I think the directors, Eric Goldberg and Mike Gabriel, did a wonderful job on putting this movie together. Pocahontas is a Disney animated film about romance between a young American Indian woman, Pocahontas, (Irene Bedard) and Capt. John Smith (Mel Gibson), who journeyed to the New World with other settlers to begin fresh lives. Her father, Chief Powhatan, disapproves of their relationship and wants her to marry a native warrior. Meanwhile, Smith’s fellow Englishmen hope to rob the Native Americans of their gold. This movie deals with Peopling because Pocahontas and John Smith journeyed to…

This scene is important to the use of history in the movie because it is adapted from the historical legend of Pocahontas and John Smith, and it is the only scene in the movie that bears historical relevance. It demonstrates the importance of racial tolerance by showing strengths and weaknesses in both characters. By making neither character the sole initiator in this scene, there is no favoritism towards one culture or the other. Disney also uses symbolism in the surrounding environment and music to help support this point. Overall, I think that the movie is fairly accurate. It captures the spirit of Pocahontas and her people, and the spirit of the early days of Jamestown. Both James Fort and Powhatan village life are portrayed authentically. London, the Virginia wilderness, and the ship Susan Constant were carefully researched. John Ratcliffe was actually in charge of the colony when John Smith was captured and released by Powhatan. Lastly, John Smith wrote that he was saved from execution by Powhatan, when Pocahontas threw herself between Smith’s head and the stone clubs of the Indians. Anything else in my opinion is pure…