Aldo Leopold’s Analysis Essay

Aldo Leopold was a conservationist, forester philosopher, educator, writer and outdoor enthusiast and was among the founding fathers of the North American conservation movement during the first half of twentieth century (Leopold, 1981). He argues that humans are part of a community that includes the land, from the soil to the rivers and seas (Leopold, 1981). According to Leopold (1981), until humans recognize that they are part of the land and act accordingly, they will continue to negatively impact the environment and their own health by extension (Leopold, 1981)
Leopold (1981), believed ethics in general rest upon the sole value that an individual is part of a community and while there may be a driving need to compete within that community…

They believed that the role of mankind was that of the conqueror, and nature, with all of her secrets, was the conquest. The Baconian attitudes encourage the exploitation of the environment for the personal gain of mankind. These ideals permeate the ideals of Western society today, and while in the short term may seem beneficial, the long term outlook has turned grim for the preservation of our natural world and the health and stability of mankind (Merchant, 1980). Conqueror mindsets, like that of Francis Bacon, may think they have their roles in the community figured out, but in reality the mentality of viewing the land as an obstacle will continue to fuel the need to exploit it for a short term gain, but a long term loss when resources become scare and the land is unable to provide for itself or for it’s inhabitants any longer. (Leopold,…

Leopold (1981) argues that in order to better understand our relationship to the land, one must have a better understanding of ecology and states “Conservation is paved with good intention which prove to be futile, or even dangerous, because they are devoid of critical understanding either of land, or of economic land-use (Foltz, 2003, pg. 433.) Leopold (1981) believes in our efforts to obtain safety, wealth and comfort, we have been deprived of the pigeon, “The gadgets of industry bring us more comforts than the pigeons did, but do they add as much to the glory of spring (Foltz, 2003, pg. 432)?” Leopold (1981) uses this as a literal example, but also a metaphor for our sacrifice of nature for personal gains. Through development in the name of progress the pigeon’s has become extinct, yet has out development helped as better appreciate the world around us? Leopold (1981) would argue that it has…