Life In Colonial Times Essay

Colonial Williamsburg represents life in colonial times with colonial buildings, architecture, and performances. The Capitol, built in 1705 and constructed by the contractor, Henry Cary, has helped build the new nation during the Revolutionary War era, now known as the United States of America. The representatives at the Capitol were at the oldest representative assembly in the world. This building was very important during colonial times and it is still relevant to citizens today, not just in Williamsburg. Also, the motto ‚ÄúThat the future may learn from the past” connects deeply with the Capitol’s use.

Because of the House of Burgesses and General Court, government and architecture that the United States continue to use today, and how the Capitol helped the colonies become independent and a new country, the Capitol deserves a commemorative coin minted for it. The Capitol strongly had historical significance during colonial times. This building was used for the House of Burgesses and the General Court. On May 15th, 1776, the House of Burgesses took a vote and spoke for independence, meaning the colony of Virginia was the first colony to speak of independence. Famous speeches about the taxes were delivered here.

For example, on May 29, 1765, Patrick Henry spoke about the Stamp Act in his famous “Caesar-Brutus” speech here. “Caesar had his Brutus, Charles the First, His Cromwell, and George the Third may profit by their example. If this be treason, make the most of it” – Patrick Henry. The House of Burgesses in the Capitol was the oldest representative assembly in the world. Along with the House of Burgesses, the General Court held trials in the Capitol. The General Court decided if citizens were innocent or guilty. The other buildings, such as the Bruton Parish Church, do not have a representative assembly and hold trials.

Therefore, the Capitol was very important during colonial times and has historical significance. The Capitol continues to be valuable and relevant to citizens today, not just in Williamsburg. This building has helped the colonies become an independent country. Decisions about the taxes and independence were made in the Capitol. The Declaration of Independence, written by Thomas Jefferson was created and presented here. This document stated that the colonies were free and independent states, and all men were created equal with three unalienable rights: life, liberty, and the pursuit of happiness.

July 4th, 1776- A new United States of America boldly declares its independence through the stirring words: We hold these Truths to be self-evident, that all Men are created equal, that they are endowed by their Creator with certain inalienable Rights, that among these are Life, Liberty, and the Pursuit of Happiness. ” Give Me Liberty. The Governor’s Palace, Magazine, and Bruton Parish Church in Colonial Williamsburg all do not have as much importance or relevance to becoming an independent and a new country.

Thus, the Capitol has value and relevance to citizens today in the entire United States of America. Colonial Williamsburg’s motto “That the future may learn from the past” deeply connects with the Capitol in many ways. The government in present day relates to the House of Burgesses in the Capitol. Today’s government continues to have a representative government like the House of Burgesses. Congress continues to be used in modern times. On the other hand, the future learns to change from the past. In colonial times, there were only two types of government: legislative and executive.

In present day in the United States of America, there are three types of government: legislative, judicial, and executive. The other buildings do not influence the government today. Also, architecture in colonial times has highly influenced architecture in modern buildings. For instance, the Capitol’s structure consists of an arch. Today, arches are used in many government buildings, such as the Capitol in Washington, D. C. This building has motivated the future to be the same, but at the same time, to be different.

Consequently, the Capitol connects with the motto “That the future may learn from the past. ” In conclusion, the Capitol in Colonial Williamsburg should deserve a commemorative coin minted for it because of its importance during colonial times, value to citizens today, and the connection to the motto “That the future may learn from the past”. The Capitol has made the colonies become one stupendous nation, known as the United States of America. The citizens of the United States of America are appreciative of the writing of the Declaration of Independence on July 4th, 1774.

The government today has been inspired by the House of Burgesses, but also has added another branch of government to become more of a united nation. The other buildings, such as the Magazine, Bruton Parish Church, and the Governor’s Palace in Colonial Williamsburg all have less historical significance, relevance to citizens today, and connection to the motto “That the future may learn from the past” than the Capitol. Ultimately, the Capitol is the most deserving of a commemorative coin, as it formed the United States of America.